Montmorillonite,

a member of the smectite family is a 2:1 clay, meaning that it has 2 tetrahedral sheets sandwiching a central octahedral sheet.  The particles are plate-shaped and extremely small with an average diameter of approximately 1 micrometer.  Montmorillonite’s colloidal nature lends it well to the transport of nutrients and enhanced bioavailability of nutrients. 

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Book Review of and Excerpts from:
Secrets Of The Soil
New Age Solutions for Restoring Our Planet
© 1989 by Peter Tompkins & Christopher Bird
Authors of the Secret Life of Plants
Harper & Row Publishers, NY
Isbn 0-06-015817-4
Lib. Congr. S591.T64

girlbehindvurtinwithscience

Montmorillonite tetrahedral molecular geometry 

 

 

    The only characteristic that all trace elements have in common, is their capacity to function in small amounts.  It is this capacity which indicates to us that they must act as catalysts, involved in hormone or enzyme systems, either as the constituent part of the molecules of hormones, vitamins, enzymes, or as co-enzymes, or as enzyme activators. Enzyme catalysis is the only rational explanation of how a trace element can produce profound biological effects.

    Trace elements function as activators, or as catalysts within the living cell, be it plant, animal or human, and they lie at the root of all living processes.

    And let me not forget to mention that there exist significant inter-reactions among trace elements.  I have mentioned already the inter-reaction between Iron and Copper.  The deficiency of one will clearly limit the requirement of the other.

 

DECLINE IN TRACE MINERAL ELEMENTS

IN GRAINS AND VEGETABLES

 

    Dr. R.G. Rasmussen – Director of Research for Triple F: Feeds in Des Moines, Iowa stated in Feedstuffs, August 9, 1969.

    “Spectroscopic analyses of more than 4,000 grain samples taken in 11 Midwest States (Ohio – Indiana – Illinois – Wisconsin – Iowa – Minnesota – Missouri – Nebraska – Kansas – Dakotas), over just the last four years, indicate a definite decline in mineral trace element content of the grains.”

    The average copper content in all of the corn analyzed for the first three years of the study was 2.56 ppm – but for the last year of the study – 1968 – the average copper content of the corn samples was less than 0.82 ppm, a decline of 68%

    The analyses showed also that the average iron content of the corn samples for the first thee years was 21 ppm, while in 1968 the average was only 15 ppm, a decline of 29%.

    Iron and Copper are essential trace mineral elements in blood building.

    Additional mineral level declines were found as follows:

Calcium………………………….…………………..41%

Sodium………………………………………………55%

Magnesium…………………………………….…….22%

Potassium……………………………………………28%

Zinc………………………………………………….10%

Manganese…………………………………………..34%

Phosphorus…………………………………………... 8%

   

 

   

These % declines occurred in just a 4-year time frame.

 Rutgers University did a similar study in which they found the mineral content of vegetables varied considerably. 

The amount of Iron in spinach varied from 1584 ppm down to 19 ppm.  In tomatoes it ranged from 1938 ppm to 1 ppm.  In lettuce it varied from 516 ppm down to 9 ppm.

    Elements such as Aluminum, Barium, Strontium, and Chromium also show a definite decline. 

    There is a convincing evidence today of the relationship between human malnutrition and soil malnutrition, between faulty diet and ill health, between soil health and human health.

 

ADSORPTION OF SERUM LIPIDS

 BY MONTMORILLONITE

 

By

Esko Nikkila and Nils Oker-Blom

University of Helsinki, Finland

December 1952

 

1.        Montmorillonite is very effective because of its high ion exchange and non-swelling capacities.  Montmorillonite adsorbs large protein molecules such as albumen, gelatin, hemoglobin, and humic colloids of soil.

2.     Because the adsorption of organic colloids in Montmorillonite is most effective at low pH, it is possible that a reaction takes place between the basic groups of the proteins and the negative charges of the clay.

3.        Montmorillonite combined with proteins has a much smaller base exchange capacity than uncombined Montmorillonite which shows that a blockage of exchangeable groups must occur.  The properties of the proteins combined with this clay mineral are also altered.  This is shown by the high resistance of the protein-Montmorillonite complex to hydrolysis by proteolytic enzymes, and to decomposition by soil micro-organisms.

4.        Montmorillonite added to diluted serum removes cholesterol and lipids (fats), besides remnants of fibrin and euglobins. 

5.        Montmorillonite used at a slightly alkaline pH (8.0), adsorbs all the cholesterol (85%) of the phospholipds, and 15-20% of the proteins.